Understanding Psychology: Theories of Learning

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You could see the world as nothing but randomly appearing stimuli (i.e., events you experience) and responses (i.e., your own behaviors), but you don't.  How do you learn that one stimulus is associated with another (classical conditioning)?  How do you learn that your own behavior can make something in your environment change (operant conditioning)?  And how do classical and operant conditioning then change the way you behave?  As it turns out, these two forms of learning--and what they tell you about the predictability of your world--can change your behavior in surprising ways.

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SECTION 1: What's Learning All About?
Lecture 1: What's Learning... (13:37)
Lecture 2: ...and What's it Not? (11:48)
Lecture 3: Research (08:19)

SECTION 2: Simple Forms of Learning
Lecture 4: Habituation (05:52)
Lecture 5: Messing With Stimuli (07:56)
Lecture 6: Opponent-Process Theory (08:49)
Lecture 7: Sensitization (02:33)

SECTION 3: Classical Conditioning Basics
Lecture 8: The Mechanics (05:46)
Lecture 9: A Few Things Worth Keeping in Mind (08:50)
Lecture 10: Real-Life Illustrations (08:29)
Lecture 11: Suppression, Facilitation, Second-Order Conditioning (06:29)
Lecture 12: Sensory Preconditioning (03:37)
Lecture 13: Overshadowing (04:23)
Lecture 14: Latent Inhibition (03:49)
Lecture 15: Blocking and Conditioned Inhibition (07:24)
Lecture 16: Contiguity and Filler Stimuli (02:25)

SECTION 4: Classical Conditioning Theories
Lecture 17: An Overview of Classical-Conditioning Theories (03:41)
Lecture 18: An Overview of the Rescorla-Wagner Model (05:43)
Lecture 19: Details of the Rescorla-Wagner Model (11:24)
Lecture 20: Rescorla-Wagner Illustrations (09:29)
Lecture 21: Preparatory-Response Theory (09:50)
Lecture 22: An Overview of Stimulus-Substitution Theory (04:27)
Lecture 23: Stimulus Substitution (First Order) (02:23)
Lecture 24: Stimulus Substitution (Higher Order) (05:36)
Lecture 25: Substitutes? Or Signals? (05:36)
Lecture 26: Sometimes-Opponent Process Theory (03:16)

SECTION 5: Operant Conditioning Basics
Lecture 27: Operant Conditioning vs. Classical Conditioning (02:58)
Lecture 28: E. L. Thorndike (04:51)
Lecture 29: B. F. Skinner's Three-Term Contingency (02:08)
Lecture 30: Operant Consequences (05:19)
Lecture 31: Fuzzy Stuff (04:32)
Lecture 32: Superstitious Behavior (08:08)
Lecture 33: Shaping (07:21)
Lecture 34: Reinforcement Schedules (12:15)
Lecture 35: Extinction, Spontaneous Recovery, and Resurgence (06:02)

SECTION 6: Operant Conditioning Theories
Lecture 36: Why Theories Of Reinforcement? (04:08)
Lecture 37: Physiological-ish Theories Of Reinforcement (03:43)
Lecture 38: Premack 's Principle (04:23)
Lecture 39: Equilibrium Theory (07:15)
Lecture 40: The Post-Reinforcement Pause (03:34)
Lecture 41: The Avoidance Paradox (04:29)
Lecture 42: Two-Factor Theory and the Safety-Signal Hypothesis (06:37)
Lecture 43: Trouble in Two-Factor Town (02:05)
Lecture 44: One-Factor and Cognitive Theories (04:01)
Lecture 45: Generalization (05:27)
Lecture 46: Discrimination Training (05:35)
Lecture 47: Transposition (01:39)
Lecture 48: The Intermediate-Size Problem (01:22)
Lecture 49: Theories of Discrimination (04:48)
Lecture 50: Behavioral Contrast (04:29)
Lecture 51: Transfer of Learning (03:20)
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